Collected Info on the Black Walnut

http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1148.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juglans_nigra

Grafted, nut-producing trees are available from several nurseries operating in the U.S. Selections worth considering include Thomas, Neel #1, Thomas Myers, Pounds #2, Stoker, Surprise, Emma K, Sparrow, S127, and McGinnis. Several older varieties, such as Kwik Krop, are still in cultivation; while they make decent nuts, they would not be recommended for commercial planting. A variety index and characteristics guide is available from Missouri Extension.

The extraction of the kernel from the fruit of the black walnut is difficult. The thick, hard shell is tightly bound by tall ridges to a thick husk. The husk is best removed when green, as the nuts taste better if it is removed then.[citation needed] Rolling the nut underfoot on a hard surface such as a driveway is a common method; commercial huskers use a car tire rotating against a metal mesh. Some take a thick plywood board and drill a nut-sized hole in it (from one to two inches in diameter) and smash the nut through using a hammer. The nut goes through and the husk remains behind.

Plants Observed Growing Under or Near Black Walnut*

Trees

  • Japanese Maples, Acer palmatum and its cultivars
  • Southern Catalpa, Catalpa bignonioides
  • Eastern Redbud, Cercis canadensis
  • Canadian Hemlock, Tsuga canadensis

Vines and Shrubs

  • Clematis ‘Red Cardinal’
  • February Daphne, Daphne mezereum
  • Euonymus species
  • Weeping Forsythia, Forsythia suspensa
  • Rose of Sharon, Hibiscus syriacus
  • Tartarian Honeysuckle, Lonicera tatarica, and most other Lonicera species
  • Virginia Creeper, Parthenocissus quinquefolia
  • ** Pinxterbloom, Rhododendron periclymenoides
  • **’Gibraltar’ and ‘Balzac’, Rhododendron Exbury hybrids
  • Multiflora Rose, Rosa multiflora
  • Black Raspberry, Rubus occidentalis
  • Arborvitaes, Thuja species
  • ** Koreanspice Viburnum, Viburnum carlesii, and most other Viburnum species

Annuals

  • Pot-marigold, Calendula officinalis ‘Nonstop’
  • Begonia, fibrous cultivars
  • Morning Glory, Ipomoea ‘Heavenly Blue’
  • Pansy Viola
  • Zinnia species

Vegetables

  • Squashes, Melons, Beans, Carrots, Corn

Fruit Trees

  • Peach, Nectarine, Cherry, Plum
  • Prunus species Pear-Pyrus species

Herbaceous Perennials

  • Bugleweed, Ajuga reptans
  • Hollyhock, Alcea rosea
  • American Wood Anemone, Anemone quinquefolia
  • Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Arisaema triphyllum
  • European Wild Ginger, Asarum europaeum
  • Astilbe species
  • Bellflower, Campanula latifolia
  • **Chrysanthemum species (some)
  • Glory-of-the-Snow, Chionodoxa luciliae
  • Spring Beauty, Claytonia virginica
  • Crocus species
  • Dutchman’s Breeches, Dicentra cucullaria
  • Leopard’s-Bane, Doronicum species
  • Crested Wood Fern, Dryopteris cristata
  • Spanish Bluebell, Endymion hispanicus
  • Winter Aconite, Eranthis hyemalis
  • Snowdrop, Galanthus nivalis
  • Sweet Woodruff, Galium odoratum
  • Herb Robert, Geranium robertianum
  • Cranesbill, Geranium sanguineum
  • Grasses (most) Gramineae family
  • Jerusalem Artichoke, Helianthus tuberosus
  • Common Daylily, Hemerocallis ‘Pluie de Feu’
  • Coral Bells, Heuchera x brizoides
  • Orange Hawkweed, Hieracium aurantiacum
  • Plantain-lily, Hosta fortunei ‘Glauca’
  • Hosta lancifolia
  • Hosta marginata
  • Hosta undulata ‘Variegata’
  • Common Hyacinth, Hyacinthus Orientalis ‘City of Haarlem’
  • Virginia Waterleaf, Hydrophyllum virginianum
  • Siberian Iris, Iris sibirica
  • Balm, Monarda didyma
  • Wild Bergamot, M. fistulosa
  • Grape Hyacinth, Muscari botryoides
  • Sweet Cicely, Myrrhis odorata ‘Yellow Cheerfulness,’ ‘Geranium,’ ‘Tete a Tete,’ ‘Sundial,’ and ‘February Gold’
  • Sundrops, Oenothera fruticosa
  • Senstitive Fern, Onoclea sensibilis
  • Cinnamon Fern, Osmunda cinnamomea
  • Peony, **Paeonia species (some)
  • Summer Phlox, Phlox paniculata
  • Mayapple, Podophyllum peltatum
  • Jacob’s-Ladder, Polemonium reptans
  • Great Solomon’s-Seal, Polygonatum commutatum
  • Polyanthus Primrose, Primula x polyantha
  • Lungwort, Pulmonaria species
  • Bloodroot, Sanguinaria canadensis
  • Siberian Squill, Scilla sibirica
  • Goldmoss Stonecrop, Sedum acre
  • Showy Sedum, Sedum spectabile
  • Lamb’s-Ear, Stachys byzantina
  • Spiderwort, Tradescantia virginiana
  • Nodding Trillium, Trillium cernuum
  • White Wake-Robin, Trillium grandiflorum
  • Tulipa Darwin ‘White Valcano’ and ‘Cum Laude,’ Parrot ‘Blue Parrot,’ Greigii ‘Toronto’
  • Big Merrybells, Uvularia grandiflora
  • Canada Violet, Viola canadensis
  • Horned Violet, Viola cornuta
  • Woolly Blue Violet, Viola sororia

*These are based upon observations and not from clinical tests.
**Cultivars of some species may do poorly.

Notice that there are 4 vegetable plant families under the “non-toxic” list. That allows for a full rotation according to usual planting practices. Jerusalem artichoke is also in there.

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